Friday, September 30, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 760"

"Love Makes Life Happy..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 759"

"With Time Love Grows..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Monday, September 26, 2011

"The Artist's Corner"

"The Jet Set:
Acrylic on canvas
Steve Walker

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 758"

"Love Is The Truest Path To Happiness..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Sunday, September 25, 2011

"In The News Today..."

'Glee' Star Cheyenne Jackson Weds Partner





“Glee” and “30 Rock” actor (and Broadway superstar) Cheyenne Jackson married his longtime boyfriend in a Hamptons beach ceremony on Saturday, reports People.

The actor has been with physicist Monte Lapka for over 11 years.

After they tied the knot, Jackson took to Twitter to announce the happy news: “It’s official, after 11 years together, Zora’s no longer a bastard. Married the best man I’ve ever known.” (Zora is the couple’s dog “daughter.”)

Jackson, 36, previously shared his vision of a wedding with WNBC New York, saying it would be “Something small. My dream wedding involves just close friends and good music.”

He added that they'd "both be in tuxes. Unfortunately, nobody’s going to be wearing a dress, but that’s okay, too … Our dog would be there. Our dog, our daughter, Zora … Pretty boring, but something just nice and on the beach.”

Last year, Jackson and Lapka registered as domestic partners at New York’s City Hall, the actor told Out magazine. “I think we were filling in some forms for wills or insurance, and I just thought, 'Let’s just make this as legal as we can,'" the actor recalled. "It was with a bunch of Russian mail order brides, literally. And it was hilarious and it was romantic...our little secret.”

Now that gay marriage is legal in New York, we’re glad to see the "Glee" actor was able to make his dream wedding a reality.

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 757"


"True Love Lasts A Lifetime..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

"A Thought To Ponder..."


Today is a rare Sunday at home with my husband. I usually work on Sundays, but I'm taking some time off to relax and prepare for an important visitor at work... the president of the Fortune 50 company I work for is paying a visit to the location I manage and so its a very exciting time in my career.

Today is also a milestone for my blog... Early this morning, my 100,000th visitor (from Novosibirsk*, in the Russian Federation) came by to peruse my posts about same gender love. Its been sobering to realize that despite what many of us believe in our youth, we are not alone... and it does get better.

In the 2 years since I began my blog here, I've had visitors from every continent on the planet, including Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America, Australia, and even the most obscure islands in the great seas (still waiting on a visitor from Antarctica, surely we are there too). My discovery has been that to be same gender loving is not an anomaly, not something strange or unnatural, not something found only in the west, but rather clearly, it is merely to be part of the diversity of mankind... part of the grand scheme of all things.

To my many regular visitors and to those just stopping by, always remember the truth that I share here and which took me nearly 40 years to learn:

"Fear Eats the Soul"
and
"A life lived in fear is a life half-lived..."



* Novosibirsk, in Siberia is the third largest city in the Russian Federation.

Saturday, September 24, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 756"

"Bravely In Love... 1980"


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.


"This Made Me Smile..."

Friday, September 23, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 755"

"Love Is The Best Journey..."
 

Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 754"

"Love Brings Meaning To Life..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

"The Arc Of The Moral Universe Is Long..."


Navy Clears Gay WWII Vet's Record

By Julie Watson, Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Nearly 70 years after expelling Melvin Dwork for being gay, the Navy is changing his discharge from "undesirable" to "honorable" — marking what is believed to be the first time the Pentagon has taken such a step on behalf of a World War II veteran since the repeal of "don't ask, don't tell."

The Navy notified the 89-year-old former corpsman last month that he will now be eligible for the benefits he had long been denied, including medical care and a military burial.

Dwork spent decades fighting to remove the blot on his record.

"I resented that word 'undesirable,'" said Dwork, who was expelled in 1944, at the height of the war, and is now a successful interior designer in New York. "That word really stuck in my craw. To me it was a terrible insult. It had to be righted. It's really worse than 'dishonorable.' I think it was the worst word they could have used."

For Dwork, victory came with a heartbreaking truth: Last year, when the Navy finally released his records, he learned that his name had been given up by his own boyfriend at the time.

The decision to amend his discharge papers was made by the Board for Corrections of Naval Records in Washington.

In its Aug. 17 proceedings, obtained by The Associated Press, the board noted that the Navy has undergone a "radical departure" from the outright ban on gays that was in place in 1944. The board pointed out Dwork's "exemplary period of active duty" and said that changing the terms of his discharge was done "in the interest of justice."

Navy officials declined to discuss Dwork's case, citing privacy reasons.

"I think that with the end of 'don't ask, don't tell,' there is a growing realization within the military that not only gays be allowed to serve openly now but this was probably the wrong policy all along," said Aaron Belkin, an expert on gays in the U.S. military at the University of California, Los Angeles.

He added: "This illustrates, at least in the case of one person, that the military is trying to set things right."

About 100,000 troops were discharged between World War II and 1993 for being gay and lost their benefits as a result, Belkin said. Under the more relaxed "don't ask, don't tell" policy, which allowed gays to serve as long as they kept their sexual orientation to themselves, about 14,000 troops were forced out, but most were given honorable discharges that allowed them to draw benefits. The repeal of "don't ask, don't tell" officially takes effect Tuesday.

Since Congress voted last year to repeal the Clinton-era law, dozens of gay veterans who were given undesirable, dishonorable or less-than-honorable discharges before 1993 have stepped forward, seeking to have the stain removed from their records, according to the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network.

The SLDN, which provides free legal representation to gays in the military, said Dwork is the first World War II veteran they know of to succeed in getting his records changed.

Many of the other cases involve veterans from the Gulf War era of the early 1990s. Next to Dwork, the oldest veteran is from the Vietnam era, the SLDN said.

Navy officials said that legally, they could have amended the discharge records of gay veterans even during the "don't ask, don't tell" era. But they could not say for certain whether that was ever done. And the SLDN said it could not recall any such cases.

"As the military progresses and the culture progresses, people should not be left with the inaccurate characteristic of their service with words like 'unfitness' or 'undesirable' on their paperwork," said David McKean, SLDN legal director and Dwork's attorney. "That paperwork has consequences for people throughout their lives."

Dwork was not allowed to draw GI benefits to continue his studies as a young man and was denied medical care in his later years. He said he needs a hearing aid that he cannot afford.

Over the years, he filed countless requests with the Navy, traveled to Washington, lobbied lawmakers and hired a law firm to help.

The Board for Corrections of Naval Records said it would reinstate Dwork's benefits retroactively. But exactly what that means — whether, for example, the Navy will write him a check for the benefits he missed out on over a lifetime — is unclear, his attorney said.

The son of open-minded, liberal parents, Dwork grew up in Kansas City, Mo. He said he realized at 18 that he was gay and had his first serious relationship soon afterward with a man he met while studying at the Kansas City Institute of Art. Both joined the Navy hospital corps in 1943.

"I had heard that the hospital corps was simpatico to gay people," Dwork said. "Being in the hospital, you took care of people who were in trouble."

While working at the Marine base on Parris Island, S.C., Dwork sent letters to his boyfriend, stationed in New Orleans, declaring in one: "I love you, love you, love you incessantly." But after his gay friends warned him to be careful, he stopped writing love letters.

Later, Dwork was sitting in class, training to be an officer at the University of South Carolina at Columbia, when MPs showed up, whispered something in his instructor's ear and marched him out of the room. His teacher told the class that if he were Dwork's father, he would cut off Dwork's genitals.

He was thrown in the brig, then transferred to a psychiatric ward in Charleston, S.C., where he said he spent a couple of weeks being peppered with "stupid" questions.

"This patient is a 22-year-old male who keeps his robe tightly wrapped around him and speaks in a slightly effeminate manner," the doctors wrote in their report. They said Dwork took an "avid interest in female attire, household furnishings and shopping."

Dwork said he had assumed his love letters had fallen into the wrong hands and led to his discharge. After he recently learned the truth, he contacted his former boyfriend, who had long ago married and had children. The man did not want to discuss the matter, Dwork said.

Dwork said he does not blame his former boyfriend; he said the young man was pressured into giving up names as part of a "witch hunt."

"It was confusing to me that anything like that could happen," Dwork said. "I always knew I was innocent, and I wasn't ashamed of what I was or what I am. It was just a sad period. I didn't know frankly at that point it would affect the rest of my life."

*********

"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it points towards justice..."


"Same Gender Loving People - No. 753"

"Love, Marriage, Home and Family..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.


Tuesday, September 20, 2011

"It's About Love..."




Tuesday, September 20, 1:09 AM

DUXBURY, Vt. — When Navy Lt. Gary Ross and his partner were searching for a place to get married, they settled on a site in Vermont, in part because the state is in the Eastern time zone.

That way, the two men were able to recite their vows before family and friends at the first possible moment after the formal repeal of the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. Just after midnight Tuesday, the partners of 11 years were married.

“I think it was a beautiful ceremony. The emotions really hit me...but it’s finally official,” Ross said.

Hours before the change took effect early Tuesday, the American military was also making final preparations for the historic policy shift. The Pentagon announced that it was already accepting applications from openly gay candidates, although officials said they would wait a day before reviewing them.

Ross, 33, and Dan Swezy, a 49-year-old civilian, traveled from their home in Tucson, Ariz., so they could get married in Vermont, the first state to allow gays to enter into civil unions and one of six that have legalized same-sex marriage.

Ross wore his dress uniform for the ceremony beginning at 11:45 p.m. Monday at Duxbury’s Moose Meadow Lodge, a log cabin bed-and-breakfast perched on a hillside about 15 miles northwest of Montpelier.

The lodge says it hosted the state’s first gay wedding in 2009.

Justice of the Peace Greg Trulson proclaimed the marriage at exactly midnight.

“This is Gary’s official coming out,” Trulson said.

Ross and Swezy were joined by a small group of close friends and some family who shared champagne with them after the ceremony.

Pentagon press secretary George Little said Monday that the military is prepared for the end of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” a practice adopted in 1993 that allowed gays to serve as long as they did not openly acknowledge their sexual orientation. Commanders were not allowed to ask.

Last week, the Pentagon said 97 percent of the military has undergone training in the new law.

In preparation for Tuesday’s repeal, all branches of the military have spent several months updating regulations. Lifting the ban also brings a halt to all pending investigations, discharges and other proceedings that were begun under the old law.

President Barack Obama signed the law last December and in July certified that lifting the ban will not diminish the military’s ability to fight. Some in Congress remain opposed to repeal, arguing that it may undermine order and discipline.

Existing standards of personal conduct, such as those pertaining to public displays of affection, will continue regardless of sexual orientation.

There will be no immediate changes to eligibility for military benefits. All service members are already entitled to certain benefits, such as designating a partner as a life insurance beneficiary or as a caregiver in the Wounded Warrior program. But Swezy won’t receive military health insurance or access to a support group when Ross is at sea.

Gay marriage is an even thornier issue. A Navy proposal to train chaplains to conduct same-sex civil unions in states where they are legal was shelved earlier this year after more than five dozen lawmakers objected. The Pentagon is reviewing the issue.

Ross, a 2002 graduate of the Naval Academy, is a surface warfare officer at the Army’s Fort Huachuca. He expects to return to sea next spring.

He met Swezy in early 2000 while Ross was still an academy student. At the time, he didn’t think through the personal implications of the military’s ban on gay and lesbian service members serving openly. But as his relationship with Swezy grew, it became important.

Their Tucson home is about a two-hour commute from Fort Huachuca, which is near the Mexican border. Under “don’t ask, don’t tell,” Ross could not talk about his relationship with Swezy, but he said some of his co-workers must have known.

“Anyone with any moderate perception could have figured it out,” he said.

When he goes back to work Thursday, Ross isn’t planning to advertise that he’s married to a man.

“Even though the law goes away, it will still be the white elephant in the room until everyone comes to terms with it,” he said.

Ross said the end of “don’t ask, don’t tell” will simplify many aspects of his life.

“It requires you to lie several times a day,” Ross said of the old system. “Being in the military is extremely invasive. It becomes a web of excuses you make when you try to be as honest as possible but you can’t be honest.”

He hopes being able to talk about his relationship will make his work easier, too.

“If you’re standing watch at midnight on a surface ship there’s not much to talk about,” he said. “It becomes very difficult to trust someone you can’t be honest with.”

********

Today was an emotion filled day... but they were not tears of sorrow that fell from my eyes many times today, rather they were tear of joy for the new found freedoms that the men and women  serving our country now enjoy.


The husband and I celebrated with meal out tonight and as I recounted my own military experiences to him, we marveled at how much the world has changed in the last 20 years.


"A life lived in fear is a life half-lived..."

"Promises Made... Promises Kept"


The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release
September 20, 2011

Statement by the President on the Repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell

Today, the discriminatory law known as ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ is finally and formally repealed. As of today, patriotic Americans in uniform will no longer have to lie about who they are in order to serve the country they love. As of today, our armed forces will no longer lose the extraordinary skills and combat experience of so many gay and lesbian service members. And today, as Commander in Chief, I want those who were discharged under this law to know that your country deeply values your service.

I was proud to sign the Repeal Act into law last December because I knew that it would enhance our national security, increase our military readiness, and bring us closer to the principles of equality and fairness that define us as Americans. Today’s achievement is a tribute to all the patriots who fought and marched for change; to Members of Congress, from both parties, who voted for repeal; to our civilian and military leaders who ensured a smooth transition; and to the professionalism of our men and women in uniform who showed that they were ready to move forward together, as one team, to meet the missions we ask of them.

For more than two centuries, we have worked to extend America’s promise to all our citizens. Our armed forces have been both a mirror and a catalyst of that progress, and our troops, including gays and lesbians, have given their lives to defend the freedoms and liberties that we cherish as Americans. Today, every American can be proud that we have taken another great step toward keeping our military the finest in the world and toward fulfilling our nation’s founding ideals.

********

He'd already won my vote, but more than that now, he's won my true admiration and appreciation for ending the most egregious failure of the modern civil rights era, "Don't Ask, Don't Tell."  Tonight, I will sleep well and so too will thousands and thousands of our troops who can now live true to the most prized of all military values... Honor.

Thank you, Mr. President!

"Fear Eats the Soul"

"And The Truth Shall Set You Free..."


It's a brave new world... God bless America!

"Fear Eats the Soul"

"The Truth Tonight..."

"Free at last... Free to love and be loved"

"In The News Today..."

Finally, the day long awaited has come... Many of the protectors of freedom now can know what it is that they've pledged their lives to defend... "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" is dead.  Long live freedom!


End of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'
Gay US Soldiers Come Out in New Magazine
By Catherine Cheney




Tuesday, September 20, 2011

More than 100 US soldiers reveal their identies on Tuesday in the first publicly distributed issue of OutServe Magazine, which explores gay and lesbian military issues. The editors -- who also out themselves for the first time -- tell SPIEGEL ONLINE how serving in Germany inspired the publication.

Eddy Sweeney, an intelligence officer, and Jonathan Mills, a radio frequency transmissions technician, were both stationed at United States Air Force bases in Germany when they came up with the idea to put together a publication for fellow gay service members.

What began as a conversation between two American soldiers based abroad became a magazine on LGBT life in the military that hit the shelves for the first time on Tuesday, timed to coincide with the repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" (DADT). It is also the day that their full names became public for the first time.

"OutServe Magazine has its origins in Germany," Sweeney told SPIEGEL ONLINE, explaining how an underground network for LGBT troops expanded to include a magazine complete with contributions from around the globe.

While Sweeney said he has long looked forward to the repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," something he called "surreal," he said it was the requirement to remain closeted that first led to his friendship with Mills.

"When you're stationed overseas, there are fewer Americans, so you don't have the luxury of making too many friends outside of the military community," Sweeney said. "And when you meet someone in the military who happens to be gay and also happens to be stationed abroad, you form a kind of secret society."

Addressing Misconceptions

The two met when Mills and his then boyfriend went out for drinks with friends in Kaiserslautern, Germany, home to the largest overseas military community. Mills, based at Spangdahlem Air Base, and Sweeney, based at Ramstein Air Base, began to notice something on the private Facebook group for OutServe, an organization for actively serving LGBT troops founded in July 2010. Many gay service members didn't not know their rights or understand the latest developments in the repeal of the DADT policy.

To address the misconceptions and bring personal stories to the discussions on policy, Mills and Sweeney discussed the idea of a bimonthly newsletter, but finally settled on a magazine so they would have room to feature more content. They teamed up with OutServe cofounders Josh Seefried and Ty Walrod on the project, and in March 2011, OutServe Magazine launched its first issue of 18 pages, available online.

"It took off," Sweeney said, and Mills added that advertisers and readers alike were eager to see more. The second issue, released in June for the first time in print, was called "The Identity Issue." It featured articles entitled "A Marine Company Commander Gets Personal" and "Repeal Watch."

Past publications limited the names of most editorial board members to initials, listing Executive Editor "J.M." and Managing Editor "E.S." -- but with the end of DADT on Tuesday, the editors could finally reveal their full names. "It has been difficult trying to coordinate the overall production," said Mills. "There are a lot of people we try to reach out to, and it is hard to do that if we can't be honest about who we are."

End on Anonymity

Since its launch, the OutServe network has grown to include 4,000 actively serving gay troops in 40 chapters, including one in Germany, another for the Service Academies, and one for deployed troops in Afghanistan and Iraq. The staff and editorial board of the magazine has expanded to include a design director, heads of distribution and advertising, and acclaimed author Nathaniel Frank, who wrote "Unfriendly Fire: How the Gay Ban Undermines the Military and Weakens America."

Along with the end of editorial anonymity comes a greater public presence for the publication. Starting Tuesday, the Army and Air Force Exchange Service will carry OutServe Magazine on select bases next to other military publications. It's a huge step forward not only for the military, but also for reaching potential readers.

"Previously, we were at the mercy of unit commanders saying 'we support this' and they would order copies," Mills said. "But having them at base exchanges allows people not assigned to these units who may not know about the magazine to pass by it on the shelves."

OutServe Magazine will add a new voice to the checkout stands on bases that have long offered publications such as Airman Magazine and Military Spouse Magazine.

"One of the things we noticed was that many of these magazines had themes and tones targeting a straight audience, like advice for families, or what to do when your spouse is deployed," Sweeney said. "We wanted to provide an avenue for our LGBT and straight counterparts to write things that would be of interest to our community and feature the issues we care about."

Out of the Shadows

In "The Repeal Issue," active duty US military members stationed around the world officially "come out" in a spread called "101 Faces of Courage." The feature includes the smiling faces of Staff Sergeant Jonathan Mills and Captain Edward Sweeney.

"After centuries of serving in the shadows, we are stepping forward and publicly expressing our commitment to our country and a commitment to our values of integrity, openness, and equality for everyone," the OutServe Magazine website reads, adding that the new issue features "pictures, bios and duty stations of the LGBT men and women who have finally been given a voice by their Nation."

"When 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell is officially dead, there will still be a lot of hesitation among service members to be honest about who they are and to say something," Mills said of the decision to have soldiers open up about their sexuality in the upcoming issue. "So we wanted to, one, say to Americans 'you elected members of congress who legislated our freedom, and here are our faces, thank you,' and two, encourage other LGBT members to step forward and be honest and know that they're not alone."

Pentagon Support

While OutServe Magazine is funded and operated independently, Sweeney said there has been coordination with and support from official channels within the Department of Defense.

"We've worked hand in hand with the repeal implementation team, and we've tried to work in tandem with the Pentagon," he said. "They've been very supportive, they've given us feedback, but it's up to us to decide on content."

The publication will appear in ten "strategic locations" on Tuesday, mainly at departure points for deployments. Hard copies will also be available in the Pentagon. But Sweeney hopes that circulation will eventually expand overseas.

"Being overseas fosters an environment where you become much closer with your peers, and those questions inevitably come up, like 'what did you do over the weekend,'" Sweeney said. "It becomes that much harder to be gay in the military."

Mills said that getting the magazines in bases abroad has been a challenge due to cost and the approval process, adding that "there is a lot we haven't been able to do because we've had to be anonymous." But both editors said that a major priority moving forward will be expanding distribution to bases abroad, and particularly in Germany, where they first found a voice for those who, until Tuesday, were silenced by "Don't Ask, Don't Tell."

*********

"Fear Eats the Soul"

Monday, September 19, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 752"

"To Love Openly Is To Live Freely..."
 

Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Sunday, September 18, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 751"

 "Life, Love And Home On Any Given Sunday ..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

"The Artist's Corner"

"Sunday"
Acrylic on canvas
Steve Walker

Saturday, September 17, 2011

"Remembering Love's Journey..."

And the traveler asked the old man, "What is it you do here?" And the old man replied, "I am remembering, I am always remembering..."

“Over the course of the average lifetime you meet a lot of people. Some of them stick with you through thick and thin. Some weave their way through your life and disappear forever. But once in a while someone comes along who earns a permanent place in your heart”

Kevin Arnold, in "The Wonder Years"

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 750"

"The Best Moments In Life Come From Love..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Friday, September 16, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 749"

"Love Never Needs Approval..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 748"

"Love Gives A Home New Comfort..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 747"

"Love Finds Its Own Light..."
 

Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 746"

"The Joy Of Love Can Be Found In A Kiss..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Monday, September 12, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 745"

"The Truth of Love Is Trust..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Saturday, September 10, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 744"

"Love Is Reason Enough..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

"A Thought To Ponder..."


Gay Homophobia...?

Yes, it does indeed exist... I was once amongst those who so vehemently deny what they know to be true of their own hearts that they strike out in fear and hate against it. I remember quite well standing in the voting booth casting a "yes" vote to ban the thing I now enjoy and hold most precious and sacred, my marriage. It was in that same year that I would eventually begin to pry open the door of the dark closet that I had lived in for most of my life and begin my quest to find true love.

The list of gay homophobes is long. I am thankful that I am no longer numbered amongst such sad souls who still live a lie outwardly while their own hearts and desires betray all that they say they stand for.

I read a story today about a site that tracks this phenomena amongst the powerful and politically connected gay homophobes.  As I perused its postings I was reminded of what it feels like to be in so much denial and I recalled that its driven by the saddest hatred of all... self hate.


"Fear Eats the Soul"

Friday, September 9, 2011

"The Artist's Corner"

"Erstwhile Spirit"
Acylic on canvas
Cody Furguson

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 743"

"Love, Marriage... Joy"


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 742"

"Happiness, Togetherness, Love..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

"This Made Me Smile..."

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 741"

"Love... It's The Only Thing That Really Matters"
 

Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Adam and Andy No. 9




Find more postings of this great comic at: adamandandy.com

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 740"

"When There Is Love..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Monday, September 5, 2011

Adam and Andy No. 8





Find more postings of this great comic at: adamandandy.com

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 739"

"With Love In Your Life, Holidays Are Happy Days..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

Sunday, September 4, 2011

"Sometimes In Advertising - United Kingdom"

"This Made Me Smile..."

Here's an excerpt from a very entertaining site I visited tonight...

from: "The 11 Most Unintentionally Gay Rap Lyrics Ever"


DJ Quik: "Dollaz + Sense"

The Lyric:
"Now, I never had my dick sucked by a man befo', but you gone be the first, you little trick-ass ho."

What He's Probably Saying:

"I'm so much of a badass, you're basically a woman in my presence, so I'm gonna make you blow me."

What We Like To Think He's Saying:

"I've never done this before, you know, let a guy put my junk in his mouth. This is my first time. You little trick-ass ho."


Read more: The 11 Most Unintentionally Gay Rap Lyrics Ever | Cracked.com

"Same Gender Loving People - No. 738"

"The Best Sundays Are Spent With The One You Love..."


Positive images of people like me... The truth of the matter is that we all need to see people like ourselves. So everyday, I'll post a photo, drawing or some other artwork that depicts Same Gender Loving People as what we are... Only Human.

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